Saturday, 4 August 2018

Invisible Walls by Chandrika Balan | Book Review


Summary:

Invisible Walls is about two women, Aparna and Kamala, whose lives run in parallel, though they do not know each other. They dream of a world without walls, but invisible barriers surround and crush them. Kamala reads a book titled Invisible Walls, about Aparna’s life, on a train journey and thus the reader discovers a story within a story. When the narrative begins, Aparna is a student in a university campus in Delhi. She is happy with her close group of friends. Later, constrained in an arranged marriage, she struggles against the confining limits of the invisible domestic walls that tighten around her with her pregnancy. Kamala, also in Delhi, is surer of her ground than Aparna. She is part of what she and her friends call the Fourcentric Gang two men and two women living together, practicing free sex. Kamala finishes reading Invisible Walls when her train reaches Delhi. She sees a pregnant woman being helped out of the train by her irritated husband. Kamala looks at her with sympathy and moves ahead. Their parallel lives move on, without touching each other.





Author: 

Chandrika Balan

Publisher: 

Niyogi Books

Release date:

May 25th 2018

No. of Pages:

Paperback, 128 Pages


Invisible Walls is a translation of Aparnayude Thadavarakal, Aswathy-yudeyum (Prisons of Aparna, Also of Aswathy) by Malayalam writer Chandramathi, Invisible Walls is about two women, Aparna and Kamala, whose lives run in parallel, though they do not know each other. When I started to read this book I wasn't too sure if I was going to like it.  The title of the book is simple. And the cover of the book is relatable to the story.

The characters are simple, their emotions, feelings and dilemmas are narrated beautifully. They are realistic in nature and you can compare them with people around you. The language is super easy and the narration is smooth. The writing for the most part is very well done and the characters will stay in your head for a long time.

The simplicity is a plus for the book as well as lack of major interesting twists also gives a bit of incomplete feeling towards the end. It's an easy read and keeps you interested enough to want to knock off the entire book in one sitting.